Bertoti Graduate Conference

 

 

Thank you to all the presenters, faculty, and student helpers who made the 17th Annual Bertoti Conference a success! Special thanks to Dr. Margaret Jacobs and Dr. Fitzhugh Brundage for your compelling talks during the conference, and to Rand Dotson, Meghan Gelardi Holmes, Kira Dietz, and Sherry Wyatt for sharing your career stories and tips with us.

 

Congratulations to Matthew Sparacio, winner of this year's Best Paper Prize.

 

Click here to view photos from the conference on Google Drive!

 

Call for Papers 2014

For more information, contact us at hgsa.vt@gmail.com.

For dining options in Blacksburg, please click here.

For information on parking, please click here.

 

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Bertoti 2014 Program

 

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Friday, March 21, 2014: Owens Banquet Hall

Registration……………………………………………………..       5:00pm – 6:00pm
Virginia Tech Department of History Reception……………….        5:00pm – 6:30pm
Keynote Address by Dr. Margaret Jacobs (University of Nebraska)           6:30pm – 8:00pm
“Remembering the ‘Forgotten Child’: The American Indian Child Welfare Crisis of the 1960s and 70s”

Saturday, March 22, 2014: Graduate Life Center


Registration……………………………………………………..       8:00am – 10:30am
Continuous Breakfast Bar ………………………………………       8:00am – 10:30am
Session I….……………………………………………………..       8:45am – 10:15am
Break……..……………………………………………………..       10:15am – 10:30am
Careers in History Roundtable………………………………….        10:30am – 12:00pm
Lunch & Paper Prizes…………………………………………..        12:00pm – 12:30pm
Lunch Speaker: Dr. Fitzhugh Brundage (UNC Chapel Hill) …………     12:30pm – 1:30pm
            “News from the Front: The Civil War is Over!” (OAH Distinguished Lecturer)
Break……..……………………………………………………..       1:30pm – 1:45pm
Session II………………………………………………..……..         1:45pm – 3:15pm
Break……..……………………………………………………..       3:15pm – 3:30pm
Session III……..………………………………………………..        3:30pm – 5:20pm

 

SESSION ONE: 8:45-10:15

Gender in United States Politics
Discussant: Dr. Marian Mollin (Dept. of History)
Moderator: Chelsea Coldiron
Room: B

Caitlin Lilley (UNC Wilmington)
“Motherhood is Political: Women in the Peace Movement from 1945-1980”

Melea Foley (Virginia Tech)
“‘Before the People’: the Intersection of Public and Private in Antebellum Politics”
                     
Brett Powell (College of Charleston)
“Institutionalizing the Ideal: Antebellum Paternalism and White Womanhood in South Carolina, 1868-1920”

 

Policy and Politics in the 20th Century United States
Discussant: Dr. Larry Shumsky (Dept. of History)
Moderator: Amanda Lilly
Room: C

Bethany Sharpe (University of Kentucky)
“Consuming Emergencies: Operation Babylift and the Commodification of U.S. Humanitarianism”

Caitlin Schindler (University of Leeds)
            “The Past is Prologue: Early American Public Diplomacy”

Stephen P. O’Hara (University of South Carolina)
“Despues del Bracero: Defining Bracero Freedom and Navigating U.S. Immigration Policy, 1942-Present”

 

Commodities and Culture
Discussant: Dr. Dennis Halpin (Dept. of History)
Moderator: Lucas Kelley
Room: F

Erica Aiken (Virginia Tech)
“Virtue Rewarded and Vice Punished: Playtime in Philadelphia, 1770-1820”

Kristin McManus (Fitchburg State)
“The 1970s and the Crockpot: Evolution of the Time Saving Household Appliance for the Working Family”

Matthew Sparacio (Auburn University)
“Commodities and the Puritan Moment of Possibility in Early Virginia”

 

CAREERS IN HISTORY ROUNDTABLE: 10:30-12:00

Moderator: Dr. LaDale Winling (Dept. of History)
GLC Multipurpose Room

Rand Dotson is Executive Editor at LSU Press. He is the author of Roanoke, Virginia, 1882-1912: Magic City of the New South (University of Tennessee Press, 2007). He has a BA from Roanoke College, an MA in history from Virginia Tech, and a PhD in history from Louisiana State University. 

 

Meghan Gelardi Holmes is a public historian, writer, and museum specialist. Most recently, she was the Curatorial Assistant for Adult Education at the Taubman Museum of Art, where she planned public programs and participatory art experiences for a range of adult audiences. Holmes received an MA in Public History from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst in 2006.

 

Sherry Wyatt received her BA in Architecture and History from UNC-Charlotte and my Master of Historic Preservation from the University of Georgia. Sherry's professional experience includes Preservation Specialist at David Gall, Architect in Winston-Salem, NC and operating her own historic preservation consulting business full time for eight years. In 2010, Sherry became Collections Manager at the Montgomery Museum and Lewis Miller Regional Art Center, which serves all of Montgomery County.

 

SESSION TWO: 1:45-3:15

Women and Political Activism
Discussant: Dana Cochran (ASPECT)
Moderator: Rose Zlokas
Room: F

Rachel Marlena Stevens (Binghamton University)
“Woman in Church and State: Annis Ford Eastman’s Fight for Socioeconomic Justice Through the Pulpit”

Rachel Webb (American University)
“Women and Terrorism: Cultural Differences and Gendered Violence”

Ryan J. Asher (Binghamton University)
“The Most Important Meal: Origins and Complexities of the National School Breakfast Program”

 

European Folk Culture
Discussant: Dr. Matthew Gabriele (Dept. of Religion & Culture)
Moderator: Kristin Carlson
Room: C

Bryan Daniel Clark (American University)
“The Evolution of Peasants into Frenchmen”

Margaret Edling (College of Charleston)
“Joseph Glanvill and the Defense of Witchcraft and Spirits During the Decline of Witch-Hunting in England”

Alison Hight (Virginia Tech)
“‘Betwixt (and Between) Man and Angell’: The Persistence of Liminality in Scottish Fairy Culture, 1572-1692 and 1811-1927”

 

Reception and Political Culture
Discussant: Dr. Patty Baker (Dept. of History)
Moderator: Erica Aiken
Room: B

Alexandra Dowrey (Virginia Tech)
“‘Supporting the Pillars of Fair Freedom’s Temple”: The Classics and the Public in Philadelphia’s Grand Federal Procession

Christopher Kegerreis (UC Santa Barbara)
“Returning to Perses: The Influence of Greek Writings Concerning Cyrus II of Persia on Philip II and Alexander III of Macedon”
19th Century Memory
Discussant: Dr. Zach Dresser (Dept. of Religion & Culture)
Moderator: Tyler Bergeron
Room: D

Gabrielle Vicari (University of Delaware)
“Sainted Dead and Holy Relics: Manifestations of Catholicism in the Confederate Lost Cause”

Melissa Janczewski Jones (Mississippi College)
“Fraught Memory and The Clinton Riot of 1875”

 

SESSION THREE: 3:30-5:20

Community and National Identity
Discussant: Dr. Matthew Heaton (Dept. of History)
Moderator:  Rebecca Middour
Room: C

Nathan Love (Appalachian State University)
“Tigers of the South: How the Sun Family Organized South China 220-280 CE”

Dan Curry (George Mason University)
“Neversink, New York: A Small Town Re-Imagined”

Nathan Widener (Appalachian State University)
“The Aluvion Zoologico: Radio and Peron between 1945-50”

 

Transatlantic Civil Wars
Discussant: Dr. Paul Quigley (Dept. of History)
Moderator:  Alison Hight
Room: D

 

Eric Ames (Virginia Tech)
“United in Interest and Feeling: The Political Culture of Union in the Virginia Borderland, 1850-1861”

Tyler Bergeron (Virginia Tech)
“Draw the Saber and Throw away the Scabbard: Virginia Military Institute and Norwich University 1860-1862”

Clinton Crum (Auburn University)
“Merchants and Monopolies: Public Discourse in Civil War England”


Local History - Southwest Virginia
Discussant: Dr. Dan Thorp (Dept. of History)
Moderator: Tom Seabrook
Room: F

Stephanie Washburn (George Mason University)
“The ‘Danville Method’ and the Summer of 1963”

Jay Coman (Virginia Tech)
“The First to Desegregate the Blue Ridge: The Galax H.S. and the Integration of Public Schools in Southwest Virginia”

Earl K. Cherry (Virginia Tech)
“Tales from Fincastle Hall: How a Community College Grew Up”

Spenser D. Slough (Virginia Tech)
“‘Pigged Lovingly Together’: Material Culture, Folk Architecture, and Cultural Landscapes in Reexamining the Southern American Backcountry, 1750-1830”

 

Government and the Land
Discussant: Dr. Melanie Kiechle (Dept. of History)
Moderator: Taylor Stoltz
Room: C

Lucas Kelley (Virginia Tech)
“At the Intersection of Social Improvement and the Market Revolution:
The Failure of the Kentucky Asylum’s Congressional Land Grant in the Florida Territory”

Gregory Nelson (Virginia Tech)
“Contestations Over the Conduct of Science: A Non-Profit Based Model of Inquiry”

Kate Good (Virginia Tech)
“‘Damned Stupid Old Guinea Pigs’: The Cover-Up of the ‘Dirty’ Harry Nuclear Test”

Rob Shapard (UNC)
“When the End Seemed Near for Longleaf: Four Perspectives that Made a Difference”